Where Justice, Love, and Mercy Meet

Tuesday two more Elders came to live in our apartment, Elder Weegi from Liberia and Elder Krofuah from Ghana. They have added a little more life to the apartment and are fun to be around. Elder Weegi knows a lot of the same people I do from Liberia. He left for his mission last May. So while I was serving in Gardnerville he was there. That is a fun connection.

Wednesday came fast and that made me happy. I got to meet and talk with Stanford before the meeting started. (Elder Stanford McCullough is serving in the Accra West mission. Bryan and Stanford were friends and neighbors before their missions. They also began their missions together in the Ghana MTC.) It was fun to catch up with him. I also got to see other evacuated missionaries from Liberia.

We had a wonderful mission training as prelude to our meeting with Elder David A. Evans of the Seventy, the Executive Director of the Missionary Department as well as Elders Curtis and Vinson of the Seventy.

One quote I liked from our mission training was shared by an AP. “There is nothing so bad that complaining won’t make it worse.” I believe that was originally said by Elder Jeffry R Holland. And is a great reminder that complaint is us moving backwards not forward. (“No misfortune is so bad that whining about it won’t make it worse.” Jeffry R. Holland, April 2007 General Conference.)

In our meeting with Elder David A. Evans. He gave a talk themed, “You get what you go for.” He ended by saying; think of what the church needs in your area and go for it.

One other thing that was great about this week was I got to see some of General Conference. We watched the Saturday afternoon session and the Sunday morning session. Except we didn’t finish the Sunday morning session because the power went out before Elder Holland could give his talk. So I looked for it on LDS library and found it. (And the title of his talk is what spurred my poem. It’s the first and last line.)

As anyone can tell from reading my emails I am not the best at writing but I do want to share this poem I came up with yesterday and wrote after church.

Where Love, Justice, and Mercy meet,
We will kneel before the Savior’s feet.
In glory, brightness, and joy he stands,
With open arms and out stretched hands.
Christ our Lord the Only Begotten,
Our repentant sins he has only forgotten.
Our thoughts, deeds, and words He knows,
Nevertheless his pure love flows.
Though each of us have committed sin,
Through Christ Jesus we over it win.
He is our Savior from death and sin.
Since the beginning and in the end.
The Alpha and Omega the finisher of our faith,
It’s only in Him we can and will be safe.
When brought before Him, He will ask,
How we performed each given task.
The faithful to Him will feel no fear,
But only shed a joyful tear,
They will answer standing tall.
But some heads will slowly fall.
When they realize how much he suffered,
For all their sins and follies he buffered.
Just then Jesus may lift their chin
To them His words have never sweeter been.
“Be of good comfort I am here,
And I will yet remain very near.”
Though I do not know what Jesus will say,
Nor how it will be on that last day.
This is just how I think it will be,
When I close my eyes this is what I see,
Of the day we are before the judgment seat,
Where Love, Justice, and Mercy meet.
-by Elder Bryan John Orton

I was thinking about Utah and it’s weather and came up with this just now:
In Utah just as the summer snows fall, the winter flowers spring.
– Elder Bryan John Orton

Elder Bofando walking ahead of Elder Orton through the jungle

Elder Bofando walking ahead of Elder Orton through the jungle


This is a termite hill we came across that was as tall as the trees

This is a termite hill we came across that was as tall as the trees


This is our church building

This is our church building


I love to see the temple

I love to see the temple


We came across these cows

We came across these cows


This is a game called Oware which is like mancala. It is considered the national game of Ghana. Oware means he/she marries in Twi. Elder Orton said is is played with seeds the size of walnuts.

This is a game called Oware which is like mancala. It is considered the national game of Ghana. Oware means he/she marries in Twi. Elder Orton said it is played with seeds the size of walnuts and holes dug into the dirt.

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