We Found the Village

This week went by super-fast. Every day was packed full of lessons and activities. We haven’t got anyone that we are currently teaching that looks promising so all of the things I could share wouldn’t have a good follow up story.

My favorite part of the week was yesterday. We got to teach the missionary prep class after church. There were just four in the class but it was our first time doing it. I expect the numbers to go up next time. The ones that came are the ward missionaries that normally come with us. Two of them already have their calls. One Sister Madugu is going July 24 to Nigeria Lagos and she leaves right after me. Sister Cudjoe is going to the Nigeria Port-Harcourt Mission and leaves on August 20 the same day Elder Hall goes home. Class went well.

We found out that a member in our ward is the founder of the Abrui Craft Village. His name is Millar. He walks with a cane and has a beard. Last week during our p-day we got to go to this wood carving market at the base of the Abrui Mountains. This is the place most of the wood carvings in Ghana come from. It was a cool.

We didn’t know where the village was. We were trying to follow directions given to us over the phone. When we got off the tro-tro and looked around we couldn’t tell where it was. We tried calling the people that gave us the directions but we didn’t have service. Then we saw a building that said craft village. When we walked over to it the building was empty. That confused me a little but then I saw something on the other side of the building through the windows. So we walked around and found the village full of African crafts. It was a very nice place. We met 5 or 6 members who were happy to talk with us.

Take care.
-Elder Orton

Some of the scenery on our way to the craft village

Some of the scenery on our way to the craft village


Abrui Craft Village

Abrui Craft Village


Some of the crafts in the village

Some of the crafts in the village are conventional Ghanaian carved wood items like these djembe drums, masks, and (Akuaba) fertility dolls


More wood carvings in the Abrui Craft Village

More wood carvings in the Abrui Craft Village


In ancient times, trees in Ghana were thought to be dwelling locations of supernatural spirits and powers, both caring and mean. The trees cut down for carving were offered purification rites. The picture on the right the stools stacked along the wall are symbols of position among the tribal leaders and can likewise be a carved record of maternal genealogy. They are created from a single piece of wood. The seat part is curved and portrays the warm acceptance of a mother. The center middle section can include writings that suggest the owner’s beliefs, history or values.

In ancient times, trees in Ghana were thought to be dwelling locations of supernatural spirits and powers, both caring and mean. The trees cut down for carving were offered purification rites. The picture on the right shows stools stacked along the wall. Stools are symbols of position among the tribal leaders and can likewise be a carved record of maternal genealogy. They are created from a single piece of wood. The seat part is curved and portrays the warm acceptance of a mother. The center middle section can include writings that suggest the owner’s beliefs, history or values.


The first man carving is a member.

The first man carving is a member.

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